Author Topic: Cleaned Up LCE Header Install for Tech from Our Members on a 1985 22RE  (Read 15009 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

KDXSR5

  • Poser Shot Extraordinaire
  • Offline The 2.5K Group
  • ****
  • Turtle Points: 61
  • Male Posts: 2,813
  • Member since Dec '06
This Thread is Featured in our Tech from our Forum Members section!



Ok, here is a short write up of my header install, the pics got kind of half :moon: towards the end.

Here is the picture of the header and test pipe




Pic of stock manifold, bolts already sprayed 3 times with rust penetrating fluid




Removed manifold. To do this, unbolt the manifold from the rest of the exhaust system (I just cut the pipe down by the cat) then unbolt the manifold from engine, and it is off!




Another picture of engine without manifold. To remove manifold + pipe, you pull up through the top, not drop down through the bottom.




Here is a comparison shot of my old exhaust gasket (top) vs. the new one (bottom, comes with the header). To put the gasket on, don't force it, and keep it level across the gasket to avoid tearing it. If you do tear it, you should probably get a new one.




Here are the block off plates that need to be transfered onto the LCE header from the stock manifold. The metal pieces are the plates after having the gaskets and carbon buildup scraped off. The new gaskets that come with the kit are on the right, old ones on the left.




The block off plates need to be modified to clear the welds on the header tubes. If you don't do this, the plates wont seal correctly, and that is bad. I did this with a bench grinder. I also cut the gaskets to the same shape as the block off plates, because it looked better, and may help prevent exhaust leaks. I was going to paint the plates to match the header, but ran out of time.




I then bolted the plates onto the header, using the bolts off of the old manifold. The header has threaded holes that those bolt on to. Then I unbolted the heat shield that shields a hydraulic line on the frame, because it gets in the way of the header (more on this later). I then put the header onto the studs (don't forget the gasket), and hand tightened the nuts onto the studs. The nuts are then torqued to 33 ft-lbs, if I remember correctly. I tightened them down in a crisscross pattern.




Here is just another pic of the header




Here is a photo of the O2 sensor. I installed the studs (came with header) before bolting the pipe onto the 3 bolt flange. I then installed the O2 sensor with the supplied gasket. I did not torque it down real hard, just tight enough that it wont come loose.




I then installed the supplied O2 wire extension kit. I cut the wire between the plug and the computer deal like the instructions say. I connected the extension wire onto the plug end, then plugged it into the O2 sensor plug. I did not use the butt connectors provided, but instead soldered the wire on with double shrink tubing over it. I did this because the O2 sensor only sends a maximum of a 1 volt self-generated signal, and I believe that the soldered connection doesn't have as much resistance as the butt connectors, and is less likely to corrode, which would provide a poor signal to the computer. I then routed the wire under a heat shield to protect the plug in, and then ran the wire along the frame, up to the other side of the cut wire. (The first picture shows where the wire and plug went under the heat shield. The second photo shows a picture of the other side of the heat shield. The black wire coming out is the extension. Doing this also routes the wire away from the heat of the header and other exhaust components)






Once I routed the wire up to the computer wire, I used zip ties to secure it in place. I then cut the excess off of the wire, and soldered it onto the computer wire. I left a little bit of the wire, because I wanted some slack in the system. The heat shrink can barely be seen under the coil (not yet shrunk).




The last thing I took took pictures of was the installed heat shield that I modified. The heat shield originally mounts with two bolts. Once the header is on, you can not reach the further back of the two bolts. Most people probably just leave it off and don't worry about it. I wanted it to keep heat off the the hydraulic line that the shield was originally shielding, because if it was there from the factory, it was there for a reason. First I cut off the back of the shield (towards rear of vehicle). I then bent it with a 3 lb sledge until it fit w/o interfering with the header. I also had to bend the line over a little bit. Here are pics of the shield installed.








And that was all I had to do, besides bolting on the test pipe. In the end, it took a lot longer than I had expected, but this was my first header install on an efi vehicle, and the first on a toyota. I am very happy with the results. I got improved throttle response, and I no longer have to down shift on big hills like I used to. I am also impressed with the quality of the header. It was made well, and the coating seems pretty durable, and should last a long time. The kit also came with every thing I needed to complete the install. I had to make zero trips to the parts store.

DieselD

  • Offline Crawler Guru
  • ****
  • Turtle Points: 1
  • Male Posts: 409
  • Member since Jun '07
 
Quote
I did not use the butt connectors provided, but instead soldered the wire on with double shrink tubing over it. I did this because the O2 sensor only sends a maximum of a 1 volt self-generated signal, and I believe that the soldered connection doesn't have as much resistance as the butt connectors, and is less likely to corrode, which would provide a poor signal to the computer. I then routed the wire under a heat shield to protect the plug in, and then ran the wire along the fram

one note to make....you need to use butt connectors on the O2 wires.  soldering will cause the signals to be biased. the way an o2 sensor works is it actually uses the air passing through the wires to get its signal to and from the pcm. soldering inhibits this.  hope that makes sense, tried to simplify it.

KDXSR5 [OP]

  • Poser Shot Extraordinaire
  • Offline The 2.5K Group
  • ****
  • Turtle Points: 61
  • Male Posts: 2,813
  • Member since Dec '06
Really? I did not know that. If the check engine light ever comes on and specifies O2 sensor, I will cut out the soldered connection and use butt connectors. Thanks for the tip!

GJToyotabug

  • Offline 4WD Legend
  • *****
  • Turtle Points: 0
  • Male Posts: 969
  • Member since Jan '08
  • The bug is deep in this one
    • Alcan Spring
huh i soldered my connection to the new plug when mine melted together. i asked many people how to do it and i was told to solder it instead

Hawk Thor

  • Offline Rock Crawl'n
  • **
  • Turtle Points: 5
  • Male Posts: 112
  • Member since May '08
I donīt see how the air can get thru the wire. Wouldnīt there be a hose if the computer needs air? It must have something to do with electrical resistance due to metalic reaction in the sensor when exhaust gas flows around the sensor.

And soldering would be better for sensors, twist the wires together, solder and then heatshrink to insulate them from grounds and humidity. Sensors usually have something to do with resistance, and buttplugs and crimpconnectors mighr change the value the gauge is receiving. Soldering has very little effect on the flow of the wire, and its a lot more secure way of connecting the wires, there is no plug for the wire to wiggle out of.
« Last Edit: Dec 01, 2008, 05:23:04 PM by Hawk Thor »

Plekto

  • Offline 4WD Legend
  • *****
  • Turtle Points: 27
  • Male Posts: 862
  • Member since Aug '07
I've always used the included crimp connectors and never had a problem.

86yoter

  • Offline Rock Master
  • ***
  • Turtle Points: -18
  • Male Posts: 314
  • Member since Mar '12
  • and the work continues
    • 86' runner build
    • Buy me a beer
i know this is old but to maybe clear things up about the wire.

DC voltage works better with fine stranded wires all twisted together. the signal will pass smoother threw the wires as long as this maintains. although as long as the solder well this is fine because we do use solid connectors like fork terminals or crimp eyes. so basically any connection can work as long as it is done right.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2012, 06:29:15 AM by 86yoter »
86' runner nothing special

KDXSR5 [OP]

  • Poser Shot Extraordinaire
  • Offline The 2.5K Group
  • ****
  • Turtle Points: 61
  • Male Posts: 2,813
  • Member since Dec '06
Check engine light never came on and it has ran fine with the soldered connection.

 
 
 
 
 

Related Topics

9 Replies
1608 Views
Last post Mar 17, 2005, 08:03:18 AM
by BigMike
9 Replies
1706 Views
Last post Jun 08, 2005, 06:33:00 AM
by derek
203 Replies
21629 Views
Last post Jan 13, 2008, 07:17:08 PM
by Thomas P
2 Replies
869 Views
Last post Dec 05, 2009, 06:59:35 AM
by Larryb
0 Replies
528 Views
Last post Dec 05, 2009, 06:26:57 AM
by 79coyotefrg