Author Topic: a special thank you to our troops  (Read 97902 times)

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topar

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #180 on: Dec 25, 2007, 11:22:54 AM »
Merry Christmas to one and all of our troops.  Thanks for what you do  :santa: :santa: :santa:

Doof

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #181 on: Jan 04, 2008, 12:40:42 AM »
my computer background: :usa:



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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #182 on: Jan 06, 2008, 08:05:59 AM »
baah i hate humping with all that stuff
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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #183 on: Jan 08, 2008, 06:25:30 PM »
this thread doesnt get enough attention...imo

MrsBUBBA

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #184 on: Jan 13, 2008, 03:27:25 PM »
I would like to say THANK YOU to all the troops.  :smooch:

abnormaltoy

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #185 on: Jan 23, 2008, 09:40:06 PM »
The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first.

I contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.
-- Winston Churchill

Censorship, that most subtle tool of oppression, the tool of the fearful and small minded. 8/15/2008

"It is interesting that we are asked to NOT judge all Muslims by the actions of a few lunatics. Too bad gun owners can't get same judgment."
Travis Tritt (I know!)

SWAMPER

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #186 on: Feb 06, 2008, 01:45:06 PM »
I was looking forward to watching the vid but then i noticed that my co-worker took my speakers...that SOB :tantrum:
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abnormaltoy

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #187 on: Feb 08, 2008, 08:48:29 PM »
I was looking forward to watching the vid but then i noticed that my co-worker took my speakers...that SOB :tantrum:

Scrounge some new speakers...and spill some Coke on your co-worker's keyboard.
The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first.

I contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.
-- Winston Churchill

Censorship, that most subtle tool of oppression, the tool of the fearful and small minded. 8/15/2008

"It is interesting that we are asked to NOT judge all Muslims by the actions of a few lunatics. Too bad gun owners can't get same judgment."
Travis Tritt (I know!)

daguy

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #188 on: Feb 09, 2008, 08:19:50 AM »
That is a very cool video!
Go USA!




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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #189 on: Feb 29, 2008, 08:55:56 AM »
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79coyotefrg [OP]

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #190 on: Mar 26, 2008, 10:23:31 AM »
one of our  Arkansas crawlers  has  gone to serve in Iraq  please  donate  for the cause  if you can afford it http://arkansascrawlers.com/main/forum/showthread.php?p=30267&posted=1#post30267
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79coyotefrg [OP]

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #191 on: Mar 31, 2008, 10:03:11 AM »
Quote from: Senator John McCain
     
   The Pledge of Allegiance' - by Senator John McCain :


'As you may know, I spent five and one half years as a prisoner of war during the Vietnam War. In the early years of our imprisonment, the NVA kept us in solitary confinement or two or three to a cell. In 1971 the NVA moved us from these conditions of isolation into large rooms with as many as 30 to 40 men to a room.


This was, as you can imagine, a wonderful change and was a direct result of the efforts of millions of Americans on behalf of a few hundred POWs 10,000 miles from home.


One of the men who moved into my room was a young man named Mike Christian.
Mike came from a small town near Selma , Alabama . He didn't wear a pair of shoes until he was 13 years old. At 17, he enlisted in the US Navy. He later earned a commission by going to Officer Training School Then he became a Naval Flight Officer and was shot down and captured in 1967. Mike had a keen and deep appreciation of the opportunities this country and our military provide for people who want to work and want to succeed.


As part of the change in treatment, the Vietnamese allowed some prisoners to receive packages from home. In some of these packages were handkerchiefs, scarves and other items of clothing.


Mike got himself a bamboo needle. Over a period of a couple of months, he created an American flag and sewed on the inside of his shirt.


Every afternoon, before we had a bowl of soup, we would hang Mike's shirt on the wall of the cell and say the Pledge of Allegiance.


I know the Pledge of Allegiance may not seem the most important part of our day now, but I can assure you that in that stark cell it was indeed the most important and meaningful event.


One day the Vietnamese searched our cell, as they did periodically, and discovered Mike's shirt with the flag sewn inside, and removed it.


That evening they returned, opened the door of the cell, and for the benefit of all of us, beat Mike Christian severely for the next couple of hours. Then, they opened the door of the cell and threw him in. We cleaned him up as well as we could.


The cell in which we lived had a concrete slab in the middle on which we slept Four naked light bulbs hung in each corner of the room.


As I said, we tried to clean up Mike as well as we could. After the excitement died down, I looked in the corner of the room, and sitting there beneath that dim light bulb with a piece of red cloth, another shirt and his bamboo needle, was my friend, Mike Christian. He was sitting there with his eyes almost shut from the beating he had received, making another American flag. He was not making the flag because it made Mike Christian feel better. He was making that flag because he knew how important it was to us to be able to Pledge our allegiance to our flag and country.


So the next time you say the Pledge of Allegiance, you must never forget the sacrifice and courage that thousands of Americans have made to build our nation and promote freedom around the world. You must remember our duty, our honor, and our country.'


'I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisable, with liberty and justice for all.'
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abnormaltoy

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #192 on: Apr 01, 2008, 12:39:09 PM »
Most of us got your back and support you.

The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first.

I contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.
-- Winston Churchill

Censorship, that most subtle tool of oppression, the tool of the fearful and small minded. 8/15/2008

"It is interesting that we are asked to NOT judge all Muslims by the actions of a few lunatics. Too bad gun owners can't get same judgment."
Travis Tritt (I know!)

abnormaltoy

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #193 on: Apr 06, 2008, 01:14:27 PM »
I just found this picture.

Thanks for everything y'all do.  :usa:
The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first.

I contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.
-- Winston Churchill

Censorship, that most subtle tool of oppression, the tool of the fearful and small minded. 8/15/2008

"It is interesting that we are asked to NOT judge all Muslims by the actions of a few lunatics. Too bad gun owners can't get same judgment."
Travis Tritt (I know!)

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #194 on: May 05, 2008, 05:43:10 AM »
Check it out, our town is doing a tribute called "Hometown Heroes."  Family members of any local veteran could submit photos of the veteran, and they were made into nice flags which will hang on light poles around town for a couple of months, and then be handed over to the veterans or their families.  My dad is a Vietnam vet, and his dad was in WWII.  The big unveiling ceremony was Saturday morning, but my dad's wife was too sick (from her chemotherapy) to go, so dad wouldn't go either.  So we took these pictures of his and pap's flags for him.  I love the pic of my dad!  He was only 19!   :usa:

RIP Kyle, we love and miss you man.  :smooch:
thanks for the smooch I miss you too !  :yesnod:

Doof

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #195 on: May 05, 2008, 08:12:39 AM »
thats really cool

79coyotefrg [OP]

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #196 on: May 05, 2008, 08:42:58 AM »
:usa:
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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #197 on: May 09, 2008, 06:09:09 AM »
June 18 08 is my ship date for good old Fort Benning, Georgia for basic and airborne training

Doof

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #198 on: May 09, 2008, 09:52:01 AM »
have fun :usa:

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #199 on: May 25, 2008, 04:27:11 AM »
I am pleased to say I have only 3 more months till I am state side once more. I am very much looking forward to a well deserved month off.

Thanks to everyone for all the support!
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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #200 on: May 25, 2008, 10:41:02 AM »
:usa: 
 'Miracle' Marine refused to surrender will to live
before

after,    God rest his soul


The young Marine came back from the war, with his toughest fight ahead of him. Merlin German waged that battle in the quiet of a Texas hospital, far from the dusty road in Iraq where a bomb exploded, leaving him with burns over 97 percent of his body.

No one expected him to survive.

But for more than three years, he would not surrender. He endured more than 100 surgeries and procedures. He learned to live with pain, to stare at a stranger's face in the mirror. He learned to smile again, to joke, to make others laugh.

He became known as the "Miracle Man."

But just when it seemed he would defy impossible odds, Sgt. Merlin German lost his last battle this spring an unexpected final chapter in a story many imagined would have a happy ending.

"I think all of us had believed in some way, shape or form that he was invincible," says Lt. Col. Evan Renz, who was German's surgeon and his friend. "He had beaten so many other operations. ... It just reminded us, he, too, was human."

It was near Ramadi, Iraq, on Feb. 21, 2005, that the roadside bomb detonated near German's Humvee, hurling him out of the turret and engulfing him in flames.

When Renz and other doctors at the burn unit at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio first got word from Baghdad, they told his family he really didn't have a chance. The goal: Get him back to America so his loved ones could say goodbye.

But when German arrived four days later, doctors, amazed by how well he was doing, switched gears. "We were going to do everything known to science," Renz says. "He was showing us he can survive."

Doctors removed his burn wounds and covered him with artificial and cadaver skin. They also harvested small pieces of German's healthy skin, shipping them off to a lab where they were grown and sent back.

Doctors took skin from the few places he wasn't burned: the soles of his feet, the top of his head and small spots on his abdomen and left shoulder.

Once those areas healed, doctors repeated the task. Again and again.

"Sometimes I do think I can't do it," German said last year in an Associated Press interview. "Then I think: Why not? I can do whatever I want."

Renz witnessed his patient's good and bad days.

"Early on, he thought, 'This is ridiculous. Why am I doing this? Why am I working so hard?'" Renz recalls. "But every month or so, he'd say, 'I've licked it.' ... He was amazingly positive overall. ... He never complained. He'd just dig in and do it."

Slowly, his determination paid off. He made enormous progress.

From a ventilator to breathing on his own.

From communicating with his eyes or a nod to talking.

From being confined to a hospital isolation bed with his arms and legs suspended so his skin grafts would take to moving into his own house and sleeping in his own bed.

Sometimes his repeated surgeries laid him up for days and he'd lose ground in his rehabilitation. But he'd always rebound. Even when he was hurting, he'd return to therapy as long as he had his morning Red Bull energy drink.

"I can't remember a time where he said, 'I can't do it. I'm not going to try,' " says Sgt. Shane Elder, a rehabilitation therapy assistant.

That despite the constant reminders that he'd never be the same. The physical fitness buff who could run miles and do dozens of push-ups struggled, at first, just to sit up on the edge of his bed. The one-time saxophone player had lost his fingers. The Marine with the lady-killer smile now had a raw, ripple-scarred face.

Lt. Col. Grant Olbrich recalls a day in 2006 when he stopped by German's room and noticed he was crying softly. Olbrich, who heads a Marine patient affairs team at Brooke, says he sat with him awhile and asked: "What are you scared of?' He said, 'I'm afraid there will never be a woman who loves me.' "

Olbrich says that was the lowest he ever saw German, but even then "he didn't give up. ... He was unstoppable."

His mother, Lourdes, remembers her son another way: "He was never really scared of anything."

That toughness, says his brother, Ariel, showed up even when they were kids growing up in New York. Playing football, Merlin would announce: "Give me the ball. Nobody can knock me down."
____
In nearly 17 months in the hospital, Merlin German's "family" grew.

From the start, his parents, Lourdes and Hemery, were with him. They relocated to Texas. His mother helped feed and dress her son; they prayed together three, four times a day.

"She said she would never leave his side," Ariel says. "She was his eyes, his ears, his feet, his everything."

But many at the hospital also came to embrace German.

Norma Guerra, a public affairs spokeswoman who has a son in Iraq, became known as German's "Texas mom."

She read him action-packed stories at his bedside and arranged to have a DVD player in his room so he could watch his favorite gangster movies.

She sewed him pillows embroidered with the Marine insignia. She helped him collect New York Yankees memorabilia and made sure he met every celebrity who stopped by magician David Blaine became a friend, and President Bush visited.

"He was a huge part of me," says Guerra, who had German and his parents over for Thanksgiving. "I remember him standing there talking to my older sister like he knew her forever."

German liked to gently tease everyone about fashion his sense of style, and their lack of it.

Guerra says he once joked: "I've been given a second chance. I think I was left here to teach all you people how to dress."

Even at Brooke, he color-coordinated his caps and sneakers.

"If something did not match, if your blue jeans were the wrong shade of blue, he would definitely let you know. He loved his clothes," recalls Staff Sgt. Victor Dominguez, a burn patient who says German also inspired him with his positive outlook.

German also was something of an entrepreneur. Back in high school, he attended his senior prom, not with a date but a giant bag of disposable cameras to make some quick cash from those who didn't have the foresight to bring their own.

At Brooke, he designed a T-shirt that he sometimes sold, sometimes gave away. On the front it read: "Got 3 percent chance of survival, what ya gonna do?" The back read, "A) Fight Through, b) Stay Strong, c) Overcome Because I Am a Warrior, d) All Of The Above." D is circled.

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79coyotefrg [OP]

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #201 on: May 25, 2008, 10:41:17 AM »
Every time he cleared a hurdle, the staff at Brooke cheered him on.

When he first began walking, Guerra says, word spread in the hospital corridors. "People would say, 'Did you know Merlin took his first step? Did you know he took 10 steps?' " she recalls.

German, in turn, was asked by hospital staff to motivate other burn patients when they were down or just not interested in therapy.

"I'd say, 'Hey, can you talk to this patient?' ... Merlin would come in ... and it was: Problem solved," says Elder, the therapist. "The thing about him was there wasn't anything in the burn world that he hadn't been through. Nobody could say to him, 'You don't understand.'"

German understood, too, that burn patients deal with issues outside the hospital because of the way they look.

"When he saw a group of children in public, he was more concerned about what they might think," says Renz, his surgeon. "He would work to make them comfortable with him."

And kids adored him, including Elder's two young sons. German had a habit of buying them toys with the loudest, most obnoxious sounds and presenting them with a mischievous smile.

He especially loved his nieces and nephews; the feelings were mutual. One niece remembered him on a Web site as being "real cool and funny" and advising her to "forget about having little boyfriends and buying hot phones" and instead, concentrate on her education.

But he was closest to his mother. When the hospital's Holiday Ball approached in 2006, German told Norma Guerra he wanted to surprise his mother by taking her for a twirl on the dance floor.

Guerra thought he was kidding. She knew it could be agony for him just to take a short walk or raise a scarred arm.

But she agreed to help, and they rehearsed for months, without his mother knowing. He chose a love song to be played for the dance: "Have I Told You Lately?" by Rod Stewart.

That night he donned his Marine dress blues and shiny black shoes even though it hurt to wear them. When the time came, he took his mother in his arms and they glided across the dance floor.

Everyone stood and applauded. And everyone cried.

Clearly, it seemed, the courageous Marine was winning his long, hard battle.

"Some of the folks we lose the fight to get better is too much," Elder says. "But Merlin always came back. He had been through so much, but it was automatic. ... Merlin will be fine tomorrow. He'll be back in the game. That's what we always thought."

___

Merlin German died after routine surgery to add skin under his lower lip.

He was already planning his next operations on his wrists and elbows. But Renz also says with all the stress German's body had been subjected to in recent years, "it was probably an unfair expectation that you can keep doing this over and over again and not have any problems."

The cause of his death has not yet been determined.

"I may no more understand why he left us when he did than why he survived when he did," Renz says. "I don't think I was meant to know."

As people learned of his death last month, they flocked to his hospital room to pay their last respects: Doctors, nurses, therapists and others, many arriving from home, kept coming as Friday night faded into Saturday morning.

Merlin German was just 22.

He had so many dreams that will go unrealized: Becoming an FBI agent (he liked the way they dressed). Going to college. Starting a business. Even writing comedy.

But he did accomplish one major goal: He set up a foundation for burned children called "Merlin's Miracles," to raise money so these kids could enjoy life, whether it was getting an air conditioner for their home or taking a trip to Disney World, a place he loved.

On a sunny April afternoon, German was buried among the giant oaks and Spanish moss of Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. The chaplain remembered German as an indomitable Marine who never gave in to the enemy or to his pain.

One by one, friends and family placed roses and carnations on his casket.

His parents put down the first flowers, then stepped aside for mourners. They were the last ones to leave his grave, his mother clutching a folded American flag.

___

Memorial Day is a time to remember the fallen with parades, tributes and stories.

Sgt. Joe Gonzales, a Marine liaison at Brooke, has a favorite story about Merlin German.

It was the day he and German's mother were walking in the hospital hallway. German was ahead, wearing an iPod, seemingly oblivious to everyone else.

Suddenly, he did a sidestep.

For a second, Gonzales worried German was about to fall. But no.

"He just started dancing out of nowhere. His mom looked at me. She shook her head. There he was with a big old smile. Regardless of his situation, he was still trying to enjoy life."

___

On the Net:

http://www.merlinsmiracles.com
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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #202 on: May 25, 2008, 02:03:53 PM »
 :usa: Thank you to all the soldiers.   :love:   :smooch:

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #203 on: May 25, 2008, 02:13:01 PM »
Thats a very touching story. Thanks for sharing Glen :thumbs:

And a HUGE thank you to all our troops, we couldn't be America, home of the BRAVE and land of the FREE, without you! :usa:

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #204 on: May 26, 2008, 06:00:14 PM »
 WASHINGTON - As Sgt. Joe Higgins patrolled the streets of Saba al-Bor, a tough town north of Baghdad, he was armed with bullets that had a lot more firepower than those of his 4th Infantry Division buddies.
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As an Army sniper, Higgins was one of the select few toting an M14. The long-barreled rifle, an imposing weapon built for wars long past, spits out bullets larger and more deadly than the rounds that fit into the M4 carbines and M16 rifles that most soldiers carry.

"Having a heavy cartridge in an urban environment like that was definitely a good choice," says Higgins, who did two tours in Iraq and left the service last year. "It just has more stopping power."

Strange as it sounds, nearly seven years into the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, bullets are a controversial subject for the U.S.

The smaller, steel-penetrating M855 rounds continue to be a weak spot in the American arsenal. They are not lethal enough to bring down an enemy decisively, and that puts troops at risk, according to Associated Press interviews.

Designed decades ago to puncture a Soviet soldier's helmet hundreds of yards away, the M855 rounds are being used for very different targets in Iraq and Afghanistan. Much of today's fighting takes place in close quarters; narrow streets, stairways and rooftops are today's battlefield. Legions of armor-clad Russians marching through the Fulda Gap in Germany have given way to insurgents and terrorists who hit and run.

Fired at short range, the M855 round is prone to pass through a body like a needle through fabric. That does not mean being shot is a pain-free experience. But unless the bullet strikes a vital organ or the spine, the adrenaline-fueled enemy may have the strength to keep on fighting and even live to fight another day.

In 2006, the Army asked a private research organization to survey 2,600 soldiers who had served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Nearly one-fifth of those who used the M4 and M16 rifles wanted larger caliber bullets.

Yet the Army is not changing. The answer is better aim, not bigger bullets, officials say.

"If you hit a guy in the right spot, it doesn't matter what you shoot him with," said Maj. Thomas Henthorn, chief of the small arms division at Fort Benning, Ga., home to the Army's infantry school.

At about 33 cents each, bullets do not get a lot of public attention in Washington, where the size of the debate is usually measured by how much a piece of equipment costs. But billions of M855 rounds have been produced, and Congress is preparing to pay for many more. The defense request for the budget year that begins Oct. 1 seeks $88 million for 267 million M855s, each one about the size of a AAA battery.

None of the M855's shortcomings is surprising, said Don Alexander, a retired Army chief warrant officer with combat tours in Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia and Somalia.

"The bullet does exactly what it was designed to do. It just doesn't do very well at close ranges against smaller-statured people that are lightly equipped and clothed," says Alexander, who spent most of his 26-year military career with the 5th Special Forces Group.

Paul Howe was part of a U.S. military task force 15 years ago in Mogadishu, Somalia's slum-choked capital, when he saw a Somali fighter hit in the back from about a dozen feet away with an M855 round.

"I saw it poof out the other side through his shirt," says Howe, a retired master sergeant and a former member of the Army's elite Delta Force. "The guy just spun around and looked at where the round came from. He got shot a couple more times, but the first round didn't faze him."

With the M855, troops have to hit their targets with more rounds, said Howe, who owns a combat shooting school in Texas. That can be tough to do under high-stress conditions when one shot is all a soldier might get.

"The bullet is just not big enough," he says. "If I'm going into a room against somebody that's determined to kill me, I want to put him down as fast as possible."

Dr. Martin Fackler, a former combat surgeon and a leading authority on bullet injuries, said the problem is the gun, not the bullet. The M4 rifle has a 14.5 inch barrel too short to create the velocity needed for an M855 bullet to do maximum damage to the body.

"The faster a bullet hits the tissue, the more it's going to fragment," says Fackler. "Bullets that go faster cause more damage. It's that simple."

Rules of war limit the type of ammunition conventional military units can shoot. The Hague Convention of 1899 bars hollow point bullets that expand in the body and cause injuries that someone is less likely to survive. The United States was not a party to that agreement. Yet, as most countries do, it adheres to the treaty, according to the International Committee of the Red Cross.

The Hague restrictions do not apply to law enforcement agencies, however. Ballistics expert Gary Roberts said that is an inconsistency that needs to be remedied, particularly at a time when so many other types of destructive ordnance are allowed in combat.

"It is time to update this antiquated idea and allow U.S. military personnel to use the same proven ammunition," Roberts says.

In response to complaints from troops about the M855, the Army's Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey assigned a team of soldiers, scientists, doctors and engineers to examine the round's effectiveness. The team's findings, announced in May 2006, concluded there were no commercially available rounds of similar size better than the M855.

But Anthony Milavic, a retired Marine Corps major, said the Army buried the study's most important conclusion: that larger-caliber bullets are more potent.

"It was manipulated," says Milavic, a Vietnam veteran who manages an online military affairs forum called MILINET. "Everybody knows there are bullets out there that are better."

Officials at Picatinny Arsenal declined to be interviewed. In an e-mailed response to questions, they called the M855 "an overall good performer." Studies are being conducted to see if it can be made more lethal without violating the Hague Convention, they said.

Larger rounds are not necessarily better, they also said. Other factors such as the weather, the amount of light and the bullet's angle of entry also figure into how lethal a single shot may be.

Heavier rounds also mean more weight for soldiers to carry, as well as more recoil the backward kick created when a round is fired. That long has been a serious issue for the military, which has troops of varied size and strength.

The M14 rifle used by Joe Higgins was once destined to be the weapon of choice for all U.S. military personnel. When switched to the automatic fire mode, the M14 could shoot several hundred rounds a minute. But most soldiers could not control the gun, and in the mid-1960s it gave way to the M16 and its smaller cartridge. The few remaining M14s are used by snipers and marksman.

U.S. Special Operations Command in Tampa, Fla., is buying a carbine called the SCAR Heavy for its commandos, and it shoots the same round as the M14. The regular Army, though, has invested heavily in M4 and M16 rifles and has no plans to get rid of them.

A change in expectations is needed more than a change in gear, said Col. Robert Radcliffe, chief of combat developments at Fort Benning. Soldiers go through training believing that simply hitting a part of their target is enough to kill it. On a training range, getting close to the bulls-eye counts. But in actual combat, nicking the edges isn't enough.

"Where you hit is essential to the equation," Radcliffe says. "I think the expectations are a little bit off in terms of combat performance against target range performance. And part of that is our fault for allowing that expectation to grow when it's really not there at all."

The arguments over larger calibers, Radcliffe says, are normal in military circles where emotions over guns and bullets can run high.

"One of the things I've discovered in guns is that damned near everyone is an expert," he says. "And they all have opinions."

___

On the Net:

Army's Picatinny Arsenal: http://tinyurl.com/6vlwm
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79coyotefrg [OP]

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #205 on: May 26, 2008, 06:11:28 PM »
if our guys gotta be over there,  they need  whatever  size weapon they want,

am i wrong  in thinking the M855 round  is a EDIT .243   .223 caliber,  so  our guys are fighting with varmit rifles  :headshake:


no wonder  we're still there after 7 years :shake:





« Last Edit: May 26, 2008, 06:31:14 PM by 79coyotefrg »
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kneedownnate

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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #206 on: May 26, 2008, 06:49:51 PM »
I don't know why they're not actively using the .308.  It's a crazy versitile round in it's accuracy, compact size and effectiveness.  They dumped who knows how much money into developing a new round a while back, all of which could have been saved (as well as the time) if they'd just continued on with the .308.
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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #207 on: May 26, 2008, 07:09:34 PM »
i had a nice .308 bolt action years ago,  i miss it :down:
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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #208 on: May 26, 2008, 10:27:50 PM »
I'm looking at rifles now...trying to get two for one. Well two types of weapons with one round, should make it easier to keep a stock pile going. I'm looking at the .308 for CQB a maybe the same in a Kimber 8400 series for longer use.

I can't believe there's any problem with getting something new for our military...the 6.8 maybe?
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Re: a special thank you to our troops
« Reply #209 on: May 27, 2008, 08:26:29 AM »
:headscratch: i cant remember for the life of my the make of my 308 but i remember it was HEAVY,  probably in the 15 pound range, 
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